Politico: The British press’s Obama complex

"Stories about the special relationship ... have been a staple of British media since the Cold War and have shaped the way Brits see the world, said Nicholas Cull, a U.K. native who directs the masters program in public diplomacy at the University of Southern California. 'British people come here and they’re surprised that America has special relationships with a lot of countries,' he said. 'It’s rather like finding out that you’re father is a bigamist. I found it to be a very strange experience to find that the story that I’d heard growing up wasn’t necessarily so.'"

New York Times: Paper Is Still the Medium, in Britain, for the Big Scoop

"[In the United States], blogs like Politico, Talking Points Memo, The Huffington Post, The Drudge Report, TechCrunch and TMZ regularly break big stories. There are few equivalents in Britain. Conservative bloggers like Paul Staines and Iain Dale have sizable readerships, but scoops still mostly appear on paper. While Fleet Street is as hypercompetitive as ever, its relationship with blogs is more symbiotic than the parallel connection in the United States, where bloggers portray the 'mainstream media' as the enemy or, worse, an irrelevance."

Design Issues: Putting Government Data online

Tim Berners-Lee: "Government data is being put online to increase accountability, contribute valuable information about the world, and to enable government, the country, and the world to function more efficiently. All of these purposes are served by putting the information on the Web as Linked Data. Start with the "low-hanging fruit". Whatever else, the raw data should be made available as soon as possible."

Design Issues: Putting Government Data online

Tim Berners-Lee: "Government data is being put online to increase accountability, contribute valuable information about the world, and to enable government, the country, and the world to function more efficiently. All of these purposes are served by putting the information on the Web as Linked Data. Start with the "low-hanging fruit". Whatever else, the raw data should be made available as soon as possible."

Wired.co.uk: Crunch time for British newspapers

Peter Kirwan: "[Many] of our wilder ideas about what’s happening to British journalism have emerged, by osmosis, from the US. ... In some ways, however, the US newspaper market is different from ours. ... In terms of sheer awfulness, the numbers reported by some of America’s metro newspapers outstrip anything we’re seeing in the UK. ... In the US, debt has become a problem in ways that still seem exotic from a UK perspective. ... Locked into a US-style patchwork of local monopolies, Britain’s regional chains have spent the last six months watching their print-based ad revenues melting into thin air. ... The stakes are not quite so high – yet – for Britain’s national press."

New York: Did Toby Young Plagiarize Passages From the ‘Times’ For ‘How to Lose Friends & Alienate People’?

Toby Young: "I don't think it's a sort of mealy-mouthed or weasely defense to say that the standard that British journalists are expected to hold themselves to are not as high as the standards that some American journalists hold," he explained. "We're a little less precious about this kind of thing." (via Romenesko)