The Australian: New online business model will succeed, says Rupert Murdoch

Rupert Murdoch: "...the iPad is just one of many tablet or slate computers in the pipeline. News Corp fully intends to be across all those platforms too. ... It's going to be a success. Subscriber levels are strong. We are witnessing the start of a new business model for the internet."

FT.com: News Corp looks at unit for tablet devices

"News Corp is nearing a decision on whether to start a news organisation to provide content for a subscription application on digital tablet devices such as Apple’s iPad, according to people close to the plans. ... News Corp is making “an honest attempt” at transforming journalism, one person close to the plans said. Separately, a long-awaited subscription news aggregation service, called Project Alesia internally, is expected to be launched in the fourth quarter with content from the New York Post, Dow Jones and a variety of external news partners, people briefed on the plans said."

paidContent: Video: Murdoch: Newspaper Ad Model Isn’t Dead

Rupert Murdoch continues his Project Alesia: “Search on the internet, whether it be Bing or Google, whatever, it’s free and they simply take all our expensive and we think very good content such as Wall Street Journal ... They are technologically brilliant, they are a long way ahead but they do not have the right to do it if we want to stop them.”

New York Magazine: A Look Inside the Life of News Corp. Mogul and Raging Septuagenarian Rupert Murdoch

"While others may see him as an opportunistic predator, ready to lay waste to whatever falls under his gaze, Murdoch sees himself as a moralist, the enemy of entrenched, arbitrary power. ... Google and the Times may be on opposite ends of the media spectrum, but they share an arrogance about their place in the world. And Murdoch, from the beginning, has found purpose in teaching such institutions hard lessons."

Guardian: The Hugh Cudlipp lecture: Does journalism exist?

Alan Rusbridger: "My commercial colleagues at the Guardian ... can't presently see the benefits of choking off growth in return for the relatively modest sums we think we would get from universal charging for digital content. Last year we earned £25m from digital advertising – not enough to sustain the legacy print business, but not trivial. ... They've done lots of modelling around at least six different pay wall proposals and they are currently unpersuaded."

The Daily Beast: The Unlikeliest Freedom Fighters

Douglas Rushkoff: "we can't confuse our actual right to make and distribute content freely with Google’s perceived right to freely exploit the content everyone makes. Google is not in this for the fun of it; they make money off their searches. By making our content available to Google, we make Google's searches more valuable. If we don't feel our content is being made more valuable in the exchange, then we don't have to accept this searchability as some precondition of Internet citizenship."

The Daily Beast: The Unlikeliest Freedom Fighters

Douglas Rushkoff: "we can't confuse our actual right to make and distribute content freely with Google’s perceived right to freely exploit the content everyone makes. Google is not in this for the fun of it; they make money off their searches. By making our content available to Google, we make Google's searches more valuable. If we don't feel our content is being made more valuable in the exchange, then we don't have to accept this searchability as some precondition of Internet citizenship."

FT.com: Murdoch’s plan may be the future

John Gapper: "[Either], as a lot of digital evangelists have suggested, [Murdoch] does not 'get' the internet; or he has looked at the figures and decided Google traffic is not worth very much. I think the latter is more plausible... [Traffic] drawn to news sites through links and search engines is better regarded as a marketing device to attract subscribers than as a big revenue stream."