TheMediaBriefing: A question for Leveson: Why should specialist publishers stay in the PCC?

Neil Thackray: "As far as I can tell from the data available on the PPC site, there has been only ever been one complaint about a business to business title. ... [The] B2B media industry is subsidising the investigation of complaints into other media whilst its own probity in matters journalistic is substantially beyond reproach. I have no interest in subsidising the policing of phone hacking journalists, or door stepping reporters anymore than would the directors of Tesco."

TheMediaBriefing: A question for Leveson: Why should specialist publishers stay in the PCC?

Neil Thackray: "As far as I can tell from the data available on the PPC site, there has been only ever been one complaint about a business to business title. ... [The] B2B media industry is subsidising the investigation of complaints into other media whilst its own probity in matters journalistic is substantially beyond reproach. I have no interest in subsidising the policing of phone hacking journalists, or door stepping reporters anymore than would the directors of Tesco."

Nieman Journalism Lab: The newsonomics of the long goodbye: Kodak’s, Sears’, and newspapers’

Ken Doctor: on digitally disrupted companies' "long goodbye": "data shows 44 percent less newsprint usage (and about 75-80 percent of all newsprint usage is attributed to newspapers) over the past four years, according to The Reel Time Report. ... I’m tracking revenues from Kodak, Sears, and all U.S. dailies through 2010 ... U.S. newspapers’ ad revenue decline is worse, percentage wise, than either Kodak’s or Sears’. Yes, although Kodak and Sears are now poster children of legacy businesses gone wrong, newspapers — as counted through their main revenue source — are doing worse."

Economist: Online newspapers in India: Papering over the cracks

"The strength of India's print press is, however, in part down to the weakness of its online offerings. This is hardly surprising. For all the country's vaunted IT prowess, only 6.9% of Indians regularly surf the web. Apart from a smattering of web-exclusive news, newspaper websites tend to be a photocopy of print editions."

Nieman Journalism Lab: NPR’s Infinite Player: It’s like a public radio station that only plays the kinds of pieces you like, forever

"This week, NPR unveiled Infinite Player, a web app that mimics the simplicity of radio, but with a personalized twist. Press play to hear the latest NPR newscast, followed by a never-ending playlist of random feature stories. It doesn’t stop till you turn it off ... Michael Yoch, NPR’s director of product development ... said he took a cue from personalization products like Zite, Flipboard, and YouTube’s LeanBack..."

NYTimes.com: Romenesko Taken to Woodshed for, um, Not Much. And Then Resigns.

David Carr: "Out in the civilian world, [Romenesko's] departure is, um, less than seismic. But to those of us who read and followed him, it seemed like an ill-advised way to end a run that was remarkable in all aspects: He was a proto-blogger, helping to define the form; an arbiter and observer of the great unwinding of journalism; and an eerily fair aggregator of other people’s work."

The Awl: The Intolerable Evolution of Poynter’s "Romenesko+"

Choire Sicha: "Romenesko's entire practice was about giving credit, in ways that virtually no other blog has been, a position that "Romenesko+" does not embrace as strongly. Poynter has worked systematically to erode a fairly noble, not particularly money-making thing as it works to boost "engagement" and whatever other (highly transitional!) web "best practices" are being touted at the heinous "online journalism" conferences that regularly go on. Charitable with links and naming bylines, and producing even more links when grubby reporters would come emailing with "but I posted that memo just now tooooo!", the intention underlying Romenesko's work has always been directing readers to reported material."

Lost Remote: ‘WSJ Live’ coming to Google TV, Roku and more

"The Wall Street Journal’s video service, WSJ Live, has expanded aggressively beyond its iPad debut in September. This week, WSJ announced it has inked distribution deals with Google TV, Roku, Apple TV and Daily Motion. Earlier, it expanded to Boxee and a variety of internet-connected TV sets including Samsung, Sony and Yahoo’s Connected TV platform."

TheMediaBriefing: The new wave of digital media CEOs taking over old media companies

Peter Kirwan: "We’re now starting to witness a long overdue exit for [media industry] chief executives of the Baby Boom generation. ... We’re also witnessing the rise of a new generation of managers who got their big breaks in the online world from the late 1990s onward. What’s different about these bosses is their hard-won understanding of digital platforms, online sales and the power of data. They might not be digital natives. But as digital immigrants go, they’ve adapted extraordinarily well to changed circumstances."