New York Times: How The Drudge Report Got Popular and Stayed on Top

"With no video, no search optimization, no slide shows, and a design that is right out of mid-’90s manual on HTML, The Drudge Report provides 7 percent of the inbound referrals to the top news sites in the country. ... His durability is, first and foremost, a personal achievement, a testament to the fact that he is, as Gabriel Snyder, who has done Web news for Gawker, Newsweek and now The Atlantic, told me, 'the best wire editor on the planet. He can look into a huge stream of news, find the hot story and put an irresistible headline on it.'"

Project for Excellence in Journalism: Navigating News Online

"the findings suggest that there is not one group of news consumers online but several, each of which behaves differently. These differences call for news organizations to develop separate strategies to serve and make money from each audience.
The findings also reveal that while search aggregators remain the most popular way users find news, the universe of referring sites is diverse. Social media is rapidly becoming a competing driver of traffic. And far from obsolete, home pages are usually the most popular page for most of the top news sites."

Publishing 2.0: How Newspapers Abdicated the Front Page’s Influence and How They Can Get it Back By Linking

"The real question is: WHY is Drudge influential at all, when all he does is link to news? The answer is that Drudge, along with Google, figured out that in the web media era, when all news content is accessible by anyone, anywhere in the world, and no news brands no longer have a monopoly over news distribution, the power of influence lies in the ability to FILTER the vast sea of news."

Publishing 2.0: Drudge Report: News Site That Sends Readers Away With Links Has Highest Engagement

"There are two main reasons why news sites are reluctant to send readers away by linking to third-party content. First, you shouldn’t send people away or else they won’t come back to your site. Second, a page with links that sends people away has low engagement, which doesn’t serve advertisers well. But if you actually look at the data, both of these assumptions are completely wrong."