virtualeconomics: A citizen journalism model that really breaks news?

"London-based citizen journalism start-up Blottr ... led the news agenda for much of Monday by breaking the day's major UK news story. ... First publishing a few minutes after 10am, Blottr broke the news of a bomb alert in London and over the day added pictures, detail and coverage of the events in the square and the controlled explosion carried out in Trafalgar Square around 9am. Sky and the BBC picked up the story around 3 hours later... "

virtualeconomics: A citizen journalism model that really breaks news?

"London-based citizen journalism start-up Blottr ... led the news agenda for much of Monday by breaking the day's major UK news story. ... First publishing a few minutes after 10am, Blottr broke the news of a bomb alert in London and over the day added pictures, detail and coverage of the events in the square and the controlled explosion carried out in Trafalgar Square around 9am. Sky and the BBC picked up the story around 3 hours later... "

Scripting News: Journalist or not? Wrong question

Dave Winer: "fights over who's a journalist or not are pointless. However, there is a line that is not pointless: Are you an insider or a user? Insiders get access to execs for interviews and background info. Leaks and gossip. Vendor sports. Early versions of products. Embargoed news. Extra oomph on social networks. Favors that will be curtailed or withdrawn if you get too close to telling truths they don't want told. All the people participating in the "journalist or not" debate are insiders. They are all compromised."

Jennifer 8. Lee: Primary Source Journalism and the Rise of “Little Brother”

"[We] are see­ing the rise of pri­mary source mate­ri­als — doc­u­ments, video, pho­tos — as cohe­sive units of con­sum­able jour­nal­ism. Turns out, despite the great push for cit­i­zen jour­nal­ism, cit­i­zens are not, on aver­age, great at jour­nal­ism, but they are good con­duits for raw mate­r­ial — those pho­tos, videos or doc­u­ments. They record videos or pho­tos as an eye­wit­ness, obtain doc­u­ments through Free­dom of Infor­ma­tion requests, or have access to files through the work they do. We are see­ing an impor­tant ele­ment of account­abil­ity jour­nal­ism emerge."

The Independent: Demise of news barons is just a Marxist fantasy

Yet another very odd column from Tim Luckhurst: "Citizen journalism's most devout evangelists are wrong. Their wisdom is purely ideological. In fact, the people who now predict the end of professional journalism's reign of sovereignty have attacked edited, fact-based reporting for decades. They think it is as an ideological invention created to sell myths to the masses. ... Forget it. Professional journalism will survive because it is necessary and the market will find a way to supply it. People who claim otherwise only pretend that their mission is prediction. In fact, they are working to mould the future to match a postmodern Marxist fantasy. "

New York Times: Passenger Hailed as Hero Quickly Finds Spotlight Can Have a Harsh Glow

"[Jasper Schuringa]’s work with the news media outlets raised questions: Was he inappropriately profiting from a national-security incident? And should broadcast networks and newspapers be paying for photo rights from sources they interviewed? Given the changing tone in the coverage, Mr. Schuringa appeared to rethink his approach."

Mediaite: CNN Pays For Cell Phone Image, Plane “Hero” Wants Payment For Interviews

"CNN clarifies the network did not pay for the actual interview during CNN Newsroom. However, there’s a reason Schuringa has not appeared any further on CNN or any other network – we hear he has asked for additional payment for any future interviews. The practice of paying a 'licensing fee' rather than a direct exchange is a way networks who claim to never pay for interviews can get around the issue. By paying for images and video, they are free to say no money was exchanged hands for the actual interview."

Gawker: The Shady Mainstream Media Payday of Flight 253 Hero Jasper Schuringa

I'm really struggling to understand why the US media is so annoyed about this: "[Jasper Schuringa] sold the 'TV Rights' of the first of his two photos to CNN for $10K. The 'print rights' went to the Post for $5K. Later, Schuringa was paid upwards of $3K by ABC News for a second photo, which Schuringa tried to sell to other local news outlets for $5K, unsuccessfully. Jasper Schuringa made at least $18,000 from two shitty, blurry photos."

Online Journalism Blog: Citizen journalism and investigative reporting: from journalism schools to retirement communities

"[A] potential goldmine for citizen journalism at the hyperlocal level appears to be populations of retired individuals, who have both the time and inclination to perform watchdogging functions for their communities, as Jack Driscoll found with Rye Reflections, a user-generated site run by retirees in a small community in New Hampshire. The drastic reduction in local news reporting by newspapers that have cut down their resources and budgets has meant that citizens are willing to take up the slack. This sort of community reporting offers people intellectual and social stimulation while fulfilling civic needs, according to Driscoll."

ReadWriteWeb: Journalism 2.0: Don’t Throw Out the Baby

"To a techie, 'content' is just something to throw in a software system. Content creators don't talk about 'content.' They talk about their art or craft. Journalism is a form of art, albeit closer to craft than art. To a techie, art is just content. Which is more important, code or art? If you had to choose between a world without computers or a world without art, which would you choose?"